Exploring Your Universe 2019!

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This year’s Exploring Your Universe (EYU) event at UCLA will be held on Sunday, November 3rd, 2019. (ALSO, PLEASE BE SURE TO NOTE THE TIME CHANGE OCCURRING THAT SAME WEEKEND)  Exploring Your Universe is an annual event held on the UCLA campus that includes science exhibitions, hands-on activities, demonstrations and experiments from multiple departments at UCLA such as: Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, Physics & Astronomy, Chemistry, and Mathematics.  The event is free, open to the public, and promises an exciting time and a great learning experience for kids and adults alike. As one of the main events in celebrating UCLA’s Centennial, EYU will have more booths, improved exhibits, and new activities. You won’t want to miss this year’s event! Please refer to THIS link for the program of events and a map!

EYU 2019 will be held in UCLA’s Court of Sciences (located in South Campus) from 12PM-5PM. Nighttime activities will take place from 5PM-8PM (weather permitting). Parking is available in Parking Structure #2 but expected to sell out so please be sure to arrive early.

To read more about previous years’ EYU events and other iPLEX outreach events, please visit the Exploring Your Universe page and prepare for this big event!

CLICK HERE FOR PLANETARIUM TICKETS (available on Nov. 1st, 12:00pm)

Be sure to follow @UCLAiPLEX (Twitter, Instagram), uclaiplex.tumblr.com (Tumblr) and @eyu_ucla (Twitter)

Summary: International Observe The Moon Night 2019

10 years after the first NASA sponsored International Observe The Moon Night Event, and 5 decades after the Apollo 11 astronauts first set foot on the surface of the Moon, we’re proud to report the largest International Observe The Moon Night event, EVER, at UCLA thanks to help from volunteers from UCLA’s Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, and Physics and Astronomy Departments.

Just short of ~1000 visitors were entertained by experts in astronomy answering questions and showing views of the Moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. This was the largest ever International Observe The Moon Night event held by UCLA, and a number growing each year. Many of those in attendance had never seen a celestial body through a telescope.

Please see the recap below by UCLA Professor Dr. David Jewitt, Dr. Jing Li, and Emmanuel Masongsong:

Many thanks to the UCLA EPSS Paige, & Jewitt Groups, as well as the Physics and Astronomy Rich Group, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Fox Searchlight for offering their support, artifacts, and giveaways for the public.

See you in 2020 for IOTMN 2020!

International Observe the Moon Night 2019

On the evening of October 5th, 2019 from 7-9PM (weather permitting) come take part in the FREE International Observe the Moon Night (IOTMN) event on the roof (9th floor) of UCLA’s Mathematical Sciences Building. Speak with experts on the Moon, observe the Moon, Mars, and other celestial goodies first-hand with our telescopes, check out Lunar dust recovered from Apollo Missions, and learn more about the Moon and space! The UCLA Meteorite Gallery (the West Coast’s largest collection of meteorites) will also be open to visitors for this special occasion from 6PM-8PM with our newest lunar meteorite on display! More information here: http://www.meteorites.ucla.edu/events/

THIS EVENT IS FREE FOR ALL AGES, AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

For additional directions and parking instructions, click here. Follow signs from the Court of Sciences.

Exact address: 520 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (the 9th floor/rooftop). If you arrive at the Planetarium located on the 8th floor of Boelter Hall, take the stairs adjacent to the entrance to get to the 9th floor of Mathematical Sciences.  Please follow the directions on the map regarding instructions on how to get to the roof as the Mathematical Sciences 5th floor elevator is out of service. There are adjacent Entrance Points marked with ‘O’ on the map as well as Stairwells and Elevators to get you access to the roof (i.e. ‘MS3’ means Mathematical Sciences Stairwell #3, ‘BE138’ represents Boelter Hall Elevator #138). ‘MG’ denotes the Meteorite Gallery (open 6PM-8PM). Please follow the posted signs to get to the roof for our telescopes and demos.


In the event of bad weather, potential cancellation of the event will be announced on this page and via our social media.

For more general information about IOTMN, click here.

Presented by UCLA‘s Institute for Planets & Exoplanets (iPLEX) and the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences.

Our 2019 official event page on the International Observe the Moon Night is located on a Facebook Event posting located HERE.

 Be sure to follow @UCLAiPLEX on Instagram, Twitter, and Tumblr for more news and information on groundbreaking science performed by members of UCLA’s Earth, Planetary, & Space Sciences, Physics & Astronomy, and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Departments!

October 5th, 2019: International Observe The Moon Night

Please join us on the evening of Saturday 05 October, 2019 from 7 to 9 PM to participate and celebrate the 2019 edition of International Observe the Moon Night as well as the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Astronauts landing on the Moon! We will have telescopes set up on the roof (9th floor) of UCLA’s Mathematical Sciences Building including UCLA’s famous 14″ Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope, Moon and Solar System experts, fun activities, and even some surprises.. It’s FREE, open to the public, and you’ll be able to observe the Moon (weather permitting).

Specific information and details for the program and activities on International Observe The Moon Night hosted by UCLA’s Institute for Planets and Exoplanets, NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Team (LRO) and UCLA’s Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences can be found at the link below:

UCLA Professor David Jewitt Leading New Studies on The Second Interstellar Visitor to Our Solar System

UCLA Professor Dr. David Jewitt is at the forefront of the newest study on an interstellar comet visiting the solar system. While you may remember that ‘Oumuamua (A/2017 U1 & aka 1/I ‘Oumuamua) passed into the solar system in 2017, a recent discovery by Gennadiy Borisov suggests this object is completely unbounded to the Sun with an eccentricity of ~3.5 and is the first interstellar comet, ever detected. This suggests a highly energetic object, unbound to the Sun which may have came from another planetary system.

In a new Popular Mechanics Article (c.f. https://www.popularmechanics.com/space/deep-space/a29091084/comet-photos-2019/) , Dr. Jewitt mentioned: “The most excellent thing about these objects is the number of them”

“We’ll detect more of them as time goes on,” he says. “It’s already good that we got the second [comet] pretty much on schedule.”

This suggests more of these objects are able to be detected by our instruments on the Earth, and in space.

The future looks promising for Planetary Science as well as welcoming more and more of these interstellar visitors to our own solar system.

In the days to come, we will learn more about the composition of volatiles coming from comets in other systems, as well as our our solar system from researchers at UCLA, and all over the world leading the way.

International Observe the Moon Night 2018

IOTMN_2018_UCLA_Meteorite-Gallery_11_17_web

(click the flyer for a larger version)

 

On the evening of October 20th, 2018 from 7-9PM (weather permitting) come take part in the FREE International Observe the Moon Night (IOTMN) event on the roof (9th floor) of UCLA’s Mathematical Sciences Building. Speak with experts on the Moon, observe the Moon, Mars, and other celestial goodies first-hand with our telescopes, check out Lunar dust recovered from Apollo Missions, and learn more about the Moon and space! The UCLA Meteorite Gallery (the West Coast’s largest collection of meteorites) will also be open to visitors for this special occasion from 6PM-8PM with our newest lunar meteorite on display! More information here: http://www.meteorites.ucla.edu/events/

THIS EVENT IS FREE FOR ALL AGES, AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! PLEASE RSVP AT: https://www.facebook.com/events/407969269736099/

For additional directions and parking instructions, click here. Follow signs from the Court of Sciences.

Screen Shot 2018-10-15 at 1.46.25 PM

Click the map above for a larger version

Exact address: 520 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (the 9th floor/rooftop). If you arrive at the Planetarium located on the 8th floor of Boelter Hall, take the stairs adjacent to the entrance to get to the 9th floor of Mathematical Sciences.  Please follow the directions on the map regarding instructions on how to get to the roof as the Mathematical Sciences 5th floor elevator is out of service. There are adjacent Entrance Points marked with ‘O’ on the map as well as Stairwells and Elevators to get you access to the roof (i.e. ‘MS3’ means Mathematical Sciences Stairwell #3, ‘BE138’ represents Boelter Hall Elevator #138). ‘MG’ denotes the Meteorite Gallery (open 6PM-8PM). Please follow the posted signs to get to the roof for our telescopes and demos.

In the event of bad weather, potential cancellation of the event will be announced on this page and via our social media.

For more general information about IOTMN, click here.

Presented by UCLA‘s Institute for Planets & Exoplanets (iPLEX) and the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences.

Our official event page on the International Observe the Moon Night is located on a Facebook Event posting located HERE.

 Be sure to follow @UCLAiPLEX on Instagram, Twitter, and Tumblr for more news and information on groundbreaking science performed by members of UCLA’s Earth, Planetary, & Space Sciences, Physics & Astronomy, and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Departments!

 

November 30, 2018: History Of The Solar Nebula And Planet Formation From Paleomagnetic Measurements Of Meteorites

Talk Title: History Of The Solar Nebula And Planet Formation From Paleomagnetic Measurements Of Meteorites

Abstract:

History of the solar nebula and planet formation from paleomagnetic measurements of meteorites A key stage in the formation of planetary systems is the formation of a protoplanetary disk containing a gaseous nebula. Theoretical studies suggest that magnetic fields mediated the global evolution of protoplanetary disks by transporting angular momentum and driving disk accretion. However, the nature and history of nebular magnetic fields have been poorly constrained. Here I review recent advances in our understanding of the magnetism of the solar nebula as inferred from meteorites. I discuss the implications of these measurements for the mechanism and rate of planetary accretion, the formation the first solids, the dispersal time of the nebula, and the formation mechanisms of giant planets.