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UCLA EPSS Prof. Margaret Kivelson Wins American Astronomical Society’s 2017 Gerard P. Kuiper Prize

Posted on Jun 23, 2017 in Featured, News

UCLA EPSS Prof. Margaret Kivelson Wins American Astronomical Society’s 2017 Gerard P. Kuiper Prize

UCLA EPSS Professor Margaret Kivelson Wins American Astronomical Society’s 2017 Gerard P. Kuiper Prize UCLA EPSS Professor Margaret Kivelson has won the 2017 Gerard P. Kuiper Prize, the highest award given to planetary scientists from the American Astronomical Society’s Division For Planetary Sciences. The Kuiper Prize is given for Outstanding Contributions to Planetary Science. From the AAS news release: “The Gerard P. Kuiper Prize for outstanding contributions to planetary science goes to Margaret G. Kivelson (University of California, Los Angeles, and University of...

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Emmanuel Masongsong’s Artwork Makes The Cover of Journal of Geophysical Research

Posted on Mar 17, 2017 in Featured, News

Emmanuel Masongsong’s Artwork Makes The Cover of Journal of Geophysical Research

UCLA Staff and Researcher, Emmanuel V. Masongsong’s artwork has made the cover of the Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR) which is a major AGU publication journal. UCLA EPSS research findings are featured on the February 2017 cover of the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics. The study describes the properties of a newly discovered form of the northern lights, called throat aurora, on the dayside of Earth facing the sun (upward, out of frame). Using observations on the ground and in interplanetary space, the aurora are postulated to form through a novel combination of...

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UCLA Professor Jonathan Arnou In The News

Posted on Feb 2, 2017 in Featured, News

UCLA Professor Jonathan Arnou In The News

Experiment resolves mystery about wind flows on Jupiter Using a spinning table and a massive garbage can, UCLA geophysicist leads team in simulating the planet’s atmosphere Views Jupiter’s south pole (upper left and lower right) and images from the lab experiment to re-create the planet’s winds (upper right and lower left). Image Credit: Jonathan Arnou Jupiter’s colorful, swirling winds known as “jets” have long puzzled astronomers. One mystery has been whether the jets exist only in the planet’s upper atmosphere — much like the Earth’s own jet streams — or whether they...

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UCLA Meteorite Hunter Jason Utas In Finnish Magazine Tähdet Ja Avaruus

Posted on Jan 4, 2017 in Featured, News

UCLA Meteorite Hunter Jason Utas In Finnish Magazine Tähdet Ja Avaruus

UCLA Meteorite Hunter and Graduate Student Jason Utas Appears In Finnish Magazine Tähdet Ja Avaruus Known for being a meteorite hunter extraordinaire, UCLA Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences Graduate Student Jason Utas has appeared in the Finnish magazine Tähdet Ja Avaruus discussing meteorites. You may find some of the samples he has recovered or has put up at the UCLA Meteorite Museum which is FREE and open to the public in UCLA Geology Building, Room 3-697 open M-F 9AM-4PM and Sunday 1PM-4PM You can download the article here:...

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The Disintegration of Comet 332P/Ikeya-Muramaki

Posted on Sep 15, 2016 in Featured, News

The Disintegration of Comet 332P/Ikeya-Muramaki

DATELINE: SEPT. 15, 2016, LOS ANGELES, CA. U.S.A. UCLA-led astronomers capture best view ever of disintegrating comet Astronomers have captured the sharpest, most detailed observations of a comet breaking apart 67 million miles from Earth, using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. The discovery is published online today in Astrophysical Journal Letters.In a series of images taken over three days in January 2016, Hubble revealed 25 building-size blocks made of a mixture of ice and dust that are drifting away from the comet at a leisurely pace, about the walking speed of an adult, said...

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EPSS’s Emmanuel Masongsong’s Figure Published in Nature Physics

Posted on Sep 15, 2016 in Featured, News

EPSS’s Emmanuel Masongsong’s Figure Published in Nature Physics

Image caption: An artist’s rendering of the magnetosphere in cross-section, with the sun and solar wind on the left and magnetic field lines emanating from the Earth in blue. The five THEMIS probes were well-positioned to directly observe one particular magnetic field line as it moved back and forth every six minutes. This magnetic field motion caused electrons (white dots) to stream along the field line and enter Earth’s north and south poles, brightening a specific region of the aurora. Credit: E. Masongsong, UCLA EPSS, NASA EYES.   Auroras Dance to the Pulse of Earth’s Magnetic...

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iPLEX-MUST Fellows Program in Planetary Science

Posted on Sep 15, 2016 in Featured, News

iPLEX-MUST Fellows Program in Planetary Science

  iPLEX-MUST Fellows Program in Planetary Science University Involvement Host Department: Institute for Planets and Exoplanets (iPLEX) Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (EPSS)   Contact: Prof. David Jewitt, Director of iPLEX, jewitt@ucla.edu Partnering University: Macau University of Science and Technology (MUST) Contact: Prof. Kwing Chan Lam, Director Space Science Institute, klchan@must.edu.mo The iPLEX-MUST Fellows Program Visitors (graduate students, postdocs and junior faculty) from the Macau University of Science and Technology (MUST) will, through extended stays at...

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October 8th, 2016: International Observe the Moon Night

Posted on Sep 9, 2016 in Featured, News

October 8th, 2016: International Observe the Moon Night

Please join us on the evening of Saturday 08 October, 2016 from 7 to 9 PM to participate and celebrate the 2016 edition of International Observe the Moon Night! We will have telescopes set up on the roof (9th floor) of UCLA’s Mathematical Sciences Building. It’s FREE, open to the public, and you’ll be able to observe the Moon (weather permitting). Please visit http://planets.ucla.edu/outreach/iotmn2016/ for more information and...

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The Asteroid-Meteorite Connection Workshop at UCLA

Posted on Apr 8, 2016 in News

The iPLEX-hosted Asteroid-Meteorite Connection Workshop occurred on 21 and 22 April 2016 and featured an international cast of scientists researching asteroids, meteorites and comets using several methods with the hope of achieving a more complete understanding of the formation and evolution of planetesimals in the early Solar System and extrasolar systems.  Details regarding the final program of the workshop are available here:...

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UCLA Researcher Alan Rubin featured in New York Times article

Posted on Mar 11, 2016 in News

Dr. Alan Rubin, a researcher at UCLA and meteorite identification expert, was interviewed for a recent article by the New York Times. The article and Alan discuss the discovery of several meteorites in Florida and the history of the parent asteroid they likely came from. To read the full article, click here:...

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UCLA Professor emeritus narrows space between astronomy, environmentalism

Posted on Mar 2, 2016 in News

UCLA Astronomy Professor Emeritus Ben Zuckerman was recently featured in the Daily Bruin for his passion for environmentalism, conservation, and sustainability. Read more about Ben’s lifelong work here: http://dailybruin.com/2016/03/01/professor-emeritus-narrows-space-between-astronomy-environmentalism/

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Professor Ed Young named Fellow of two geochemical associations

Posted on Feb 10, 2016 in News

Professor Ed Young named Fellow of two geochemical associations

Congratulations to Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences Professor Ed Young who has been named a Fellow of the Geochemical Society and of the European Association of Geochemistry.  The award is “bestowed upon outstanding scientists who have, over some years, made a major contribution to the field of geochemistry”.  Ed will be honored at the Goldschmidt meeting in Yokohama this...

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Planets on Parade

Posted on Feb 9, 2016 in News

Planets on Parade

Late January and early February have provided spectacular views of the planets in the early morning sky. It is the first time that the bright planets that can be seen with the naked eye have been simultaneously visible since 2005. In their outward order from the sun, the five bright planets are Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. They are visible because they are large and relatively close compared with other celestial objects like stars. Their surfaces and disks reflect sunlight and shine steadily, compared to the distant twinkling light that emanates from stars. Many of the planets...

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Bidding Farewell to UCLA Professor Mike Jura

Posted on Feb 2, 2016 in News

Bidding Farewell to UCLA Professor Mike Jura

It is with sadness that we report the passing of UCLA professor and distinguished astronomer, Michael Jura. A facet to the Department of Physics and Astronomy and an active member of iPLEX, Mike always encouraged the interdisciplinary blending of planetary science and astronomy. He made major contributions to the fields of theoretical and observational astronomy and was influential in the development of infrared astronomy and the Infrared Laboratory at UCLA, which now has instruments in many terrestrial and space telescopes. His presence will be missed in both the fields of astronomy and...

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UCLA scientists study the Moon-forming impact using oxygen isotopes

Posted on Jan 29, 2016 in News

UCLA scientists study the Moon-forming impact using oxygen isotopes

UCLA scientists Ed Young, Issaku Kohl, Paul Warren, and their collaborators are featured in Science today (January 29, 2016) with their paper “Oxygen isotopic evidence for vigorous mixing during the Moon-forming giant impact.” Using their new Panorama high-resolution mass spectrometer, which is housed at UCLA, the team has performed ultra-high precision oxygen isotope analyses of lunar samples. The compositions match those of Earth’s mantle rocks to within a few parts-per-million (in the Δ17O parameter), demonstrating that the Earth and Moon formed from the exact same reservoir of...

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UCLA Astronomer Gives TED Talk

Posted on Jan 11, 2016 in News

UCLA Astronomer Gives TED Talk

UC President’s Postdoctoral Program Fellow Dr. Aomawa Shields was awarded a TED Fellowship, which included giving a TED talk about how she searches for clues that life might exist elsewhere in the universe by examining the atmospheres of distant exoplanets. The classically trained actress-turned-astronomer also discusses her passion for engaging young women in the sciences through theater and art.

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UCLA scientists attend the 47th annual American Astronomical Society’s Division of Planetary Science meeting

Posted on Nov 20, 2015 in News

UCLA scientists attend the 47th annual American Astronomical Society’s Division of Planetary Science meeting

Direct from the 2015 Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) Meeting in National Harbor, Maryland, pictured is a small fraction of UCLA’s EPSS students and researchers from the Jewitt and Margot Research Groups; (left to right) Man-To Hui, Ariel Graykowski, Danielle Hastings, Ashok Verma, Dave Milewski, Oliver Bowman, and Adam Greenberg, with 3 posters and 2 talks: –107.05. Mercury’s gravity field, tidal Love number k2, and spin axis orientation revealed with MESSENGER radio tracking data –307.04. Improved Algorithms for Radar-Based Reconstruction of Asteroid Spin States and...

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iPLEX and space scientists featured in UCLA’s Prime Magazine

Posted on Nov 17, 2015 in Featured, News

iPLEX and space scientists featured in UCLA’s Prime Magazine

The Institute for Planets and Exoplanets (iPLEX) is currently featured in UCLA’s Prime Magazine. The article, written by UCLA student Allison Ong recaps the efforts of the institute and individuals to promote planetary and space science at UCLA and within the broader community over the past four years, from hosting conferences to building a public outreach program. The article is available at newsstands on the UCLA Campus and online...

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UCLA Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences Distinguished Alumni Lecture

Posted on Oct 29, 2015 in News

UCLA Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences Distinguished Alumni Lecture

From the Sun to the Edge of the Solar System Dr. David J. McComas, ’86 Assistant Vice President, Space Science & Engineering, Southwest Research Institute Professor of Physics, University of Texas San Antonio The Sun produces a million mile per hour wind of hot ionized gas that flows out all directions in space all of the time. This solar wind interacts with the planets and other objects in the solar system and, at Earth, produces both beautiful aurora and dangerous space weather that can kill orbiting satellites. Further out, the solar wind inflates a bubble in the local...

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UCLA scientists reset the clock on the beginning of life on Earth

Posted on Oct 19, 2015 in News

UCLA scientists reset the clock on the beginning of life on Earth

UCLA geochemist Beth Ann Bell and her colleagues have dug deep into the annals of Earth’s history and turned up the result that life may have begun much earlier than previously thought. In the study, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they examined microscopic graphite inside tiny, ancient zircon grains from the Jack Hills in Western Australia. The graphite samples, which are made of carbon, contain information about the chemistry of the planet during the time they were formed. This chemistry, in turn, can help scientists decipher if biologic...

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